Monday, March 02, 2009

Storm Track Infiltration: A Turkish Future for Lorraine

From the Brussels Journal

There is an article, with numerous links, posted by Joachim Véliocas at his website Islamisation. It concerns the Turkish population of Metz, capital of the Lorraine region in the northeast of France, and its hope for a giant mosque of its own, despite the many prayer rooms that already exist in the city. The article is based on a report in the daily Républicain Lorrain, dated February 20, that discusses plans for the mosque, focusing on comments made by the leaders of five Turkish associations of the city of Metz. Each of these associations hopes to manage or co-manage the projected mosque. One of the associatio

ns is the Islamist Milli Görüs party, whose founder, the former prime Minister of Turkey Necmettin Erbakan, was forced out of power in 1997 by the Turkish military and by the constitutional court that found him too radical.

According to Véliocas, Milli Görüs, is spreading with impunity throughout France, while the Interior Minister does nothing to stop

 it:

The term "milli görüs" means "national religious path" and the movement is classified as "fundamentalist Islam" by German intelligence services. The former minister from Lower Saxony, Sigmar Gabriel, places it in the same category as Hamas, and says that it counts among its members Bin Laden supporters. An internal memo from Milli Görüs, discovered by the German Interior Ministry in 1999, reads:
 
"The Community (i.e. the Turkish community) is a means working for an end – the end being to Islamize (German) society.""Milli Görüs is a shield that protects our compatriots from European barbarity."
"Democracy is a Western error."

 
 The Milli Görüs logo looks ahead to the future: a white crescent on a green background - color of hope and of Islam - that covers the map of Europe. Their plan is to restore the Caliphate... in Metz!

The article in Républicain Lorrain notes:

The city officials will meet as a steering committee on March 4 for the initial phase of talks and to lay the groundwork for a vast construction, that of a giant mosque. […] Before the giant mosque there were the existing prayer rooms. They are almost all too small, but the associations do not want to abandon their own plans for extensions. Ahmed Duman, president of the Turkish cultural center, is adamant (about keeping his own plans to enlarge his prayer room): "I cannot carry out my plans there. A big mosque with offices for everyone will be like a housing project with apartments. [...] We want our own place! […] We have already spent 25,000 euros studying architects' plans. The previous city administration had found land for us[...] Why did they freeze our project? The city officials and the steering committee must show good faith regarding our projects and the projects of all the associations."


The above comment by Ahmed Duman and several others cited by Véliocas all point to the fact that these Turkish community leaders want BOTH the new giant mosque AND an extension of their own prayer rooms, so they can work in peace in their own space, and enjoy the benefits of a larger mosque as well.
   
Joachim Véliocas closes with a rhetorical question:

When will there be a parliamentary investigation into Milli Görüs and the UOIF in France? If imams can come into France from Turkey, Turkey itself refuses the visas of foreign priests on its territory. There has been an insidious religious cleansing in Turkey where Christians were 20% of the population (in 1910) and are only 1% today.

 

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